How Has Technology Changed Over Time Within The Classroom

 In the 20th century, technology helped to redefine how students could visualise education – by projecting images within the classroom with the help of projectors. First introduced in 1925, the Filmstrip Projector could be used depending on the subject being taught, helping students visualise the subject.

To help people learn, the radio and the mimeograph were tools that could be used in classrooms to help transform learning. Introduced in 1940, the mimeograph allowed teachers to copy and distribute educational materials to students, while the radio could be used to transit lessons to other classrooms in other areas. Today, public address system installations have become more advanced, and GPS Installations are leading the way when it comes to systems that help to address the public.

Also known as an old-fashioned ruler, the slide ruler was notably popularised in America. Replacing the mimeograph as a more efficient alternative, the photocopier was also used to help speed up and quantify the distribution of educational materials. 

As some of the most successful technological advances in the classroom, these have made a lasting impression:

·         1960s. Although it did not become popular within classrooms for another ten years, the calculator was introduced in this decade.

·         1970s. Used as a device to mark exam papers and other question papers, the Scantron machine has lasted to the present day as a way of speeding up the marking process.

·         1980s. Personal computers were starting to be introduced and learners could use them to help improve their knowledge of a particular subject.

·         1990s. While replacing traditional blackboards with interactive whiteboards, desktop computers were also becoming prevalent within most households, helping students to complete homework tasks on office-based packages.

The digital classroom

As technology in the 20th century became more advanced, the time it took to make these advances shortened, which resulted in more technologies for children to utilise within the classroom. However, with the rise of smartphones, YouTube, tablets and laptops – no one has experienced such dramatic technological changes as those living in the 21st century. Considered as the digital revolution, integrating smart technologies into the classroom has changed the way educators teach and how students learn.

In one study, the classroom was split into two groups; groups A and B. Both groups were asked to research a topic and present their findings to the whole group, however, group A were not allowed mobile technologies whereas group B were. What was discovered is that group B divided into sub-groups, whereas group A stayed together. What this suggests is that technology can help aid integrated organisational structures within learning groups, which leads to more specific and concentrated learning, in comparison to the generalised learning and collaboration witnessed in group A.

Research has suggested that most teachers have responded positively to technology being used in the classroom. In the US, 86% claimed that technology was an essential part of a student’s education. Furthermore, 92% felt that they could have more technology within their classroom to help the quality of their educational delivery improve.

When technology is used within the classroom, this allows students to save the money they would spend on text books, whilst helping to improve the quality of a lesson. Electronic copies of eBooks and other digital-based learning materials are 33 – 35% cheaper than their physical alternatives. Increasing their chances of passing an exam, tablets and other interactive digital devices have improved literacy and numeracy skills.

Even though many students and teachers feel as though technology has improved the quality of a lesson, some believe that technology is hindering learning. This is because children can be distracted by social media apps and other interactive games when they should be learning. In a study conducted by A Common Sense Media, it was reported that 71% of teaching staff felt that a student’s attention span had been compromised by smart devices such as mobiles and tablets. What this suggests is that as digital technologies have been adopted into our classrooms, we still haven’t found the correct balance between utilising digital technologies as a source for quality education, and making sure that they aren’t being used to the extent where they become a distraction.

Making sure that education is beneficial, and is improving the learning of every pupil, is crucial. This is why the digital revolution has benefited the classroom – even though its impact has been received both positively and negatively. If education institutions can get the balance right between interaction and distraction, there is no reason why digital technologies can’t transform the learning capabilities of young people.In the 20th century, technology helped to redefine how students could visualise education – by projecting images within the classroom with the help of projectors. First introduced in 1925, the Filmstrip Projector could be used depending on the subject being taught, helping students visualise the subject.

To help people learn, the radio and the mimeograph were tools that could be used in classrooms to help transform learning. Introduced in 1940, the mimeograph allowed teachers to copy and distribute educational materials to students, while the radio could be used to transit lessons to other classrooms in other areas. Today, public address system installations have become more advanced, and GPS Installations are leading the way when it comes to systems that help to address the public.

Also known as an old-fashioned ruler, the slide ruler was notably popularised in America. Replacing the mimeograph as a more efficient alternative, the photocopier was also used to help speed up and quantify the distribution of educational materials. 

As some of the most successful technological advances in the classroom, these have made a lasting impression:

·         1960s. Although it did not become popular within classrooms for another ten years, the calculator was introduced in this decade.

·         1970s. Used as a device to mark exam papers and other question papers, the Scantron machine has lasted to the present day as a way of speeding up the marking process.

·         1980s. Personal computers were starting to be introduced and learners could use them to help improve their knowledge of a particular subject.

·         1990s. While replacing traditional blackboards with interactive whiteboards, desktop computers were also becoming prevalent within most households, helping students to complete homework tasks on office-based packages.

The digital classroom

As technology in the 20th century became more advanced, the time it took to make these advances shortened, which resulted in more technologies for children to utilise within the classroom. However, with the rise of smartphones, YouTube, tablets and laptops – no one has experienced such dramatic technological changes as those living in the 21st century. Considered as the digital revolution, integrating smart technologies into the classroom has changed the way educators teach and how students learn.

In one study, the classroom was split into two groups; groups A and B. Both groups were asked to research a topic and present their findings to the whole group, however, group A were not allowed mobile technologies whereas group B were. What was discovered is that group B divided into sub-groups, whereas group A stayed together. What this suggests is that technology can help aid integrated organisational structures within learning groups, which leads to more specific and concentrated learning, in comparison to the generalised learning and collaboration witnessed in group A.

 

 

Research has suggested that most teachers have responded positively to technology being used in the classroom. In the US, 86% claimed that technology was an essential part of a student’s education. Furthermore, 92% felt that they could have more technology within their classroom to help the quality of their educational delivery improve.

When technology is used within the classroom, this allows students to save the money they would spend on text books, whilst helping to improve the quality of a lesson. Electronic copies of eBooks and other digital-based learning materials are 33 – 35% cheaper than their physical alternatives. Increasing their chances of passing an exam, tablets and other interactive digital devices have improved literacy and numeracy skills.

Even though many students and teachers feel as though technology has improved the quality of a lesson, some believe that technology is hindering learning. This is because children can be distracted by social media apps and other interactive games when they should be learning. In a study conducted by A Common Sense Media, it was reported that 71% of teaching staff felt that a student’s attention span had been compromised by smart devices such as mobiles and tablets. What this suggests is that as digital technologies have been adopted into our classrooms, we still haven’t found the correct balance between utilising digital technologies as a source for quality education, and making sure that they aren’t being used to the extent where they become a distraction.

Making sure that education is beneficial, and is improving the learning of every pupil, is crucial. This is why the digital revolution has benefited the classroom – even though its impact has been received both positively and negatively. If education institutions can get the balance right between interaction and distraction, there is no reason why digital technologies can’t transform the learning capabilities of young people. 

     
   
   
 
  Link to this article:
(Copy and paste the following code to your web page.)
 
 

Education Magazine | Advertising | Education Emails - More Articles